• Helen Avaient

Gingin is a win-win in Western Australia

Driving back from Toodyay towards Perth, the road passes through lovely farming countryside. Local farmers sell excess produce at their farm gates. Avocados for $1 each were a bargain, when they are currently $3 each in the supermarkets. A bag of oranges was $5. It is always a bonus if the farmer is there to have a chat with. When I bought some avocados the farmer’s wife told me that avocados mature on the tree but cannot be eaten until about a week or so after they are picked.


Gingin is a small town of roughly 500 people and was established in 1831 only two years after the Swan River colony. I headed for Gingin on my search for wildflowers, after being advised by other tourists that the little local cemetery had some beautiful flowers amongst the old headstones. Always interested in cemeteries, it was a double pleasure to visit the little Anglican church of St Luke. Established in 1861 it is built of casuarina stone with a shingled roof, and still in use today. School was originally held here.


The small cemetery had some old headstones, and one of them stood out. Robert and Clara De Burgh lost 3 of their small children from diphtheria in the same week in 1865.


There were lots of wildflowers scattered throughout the church grounds.


Next to the church was the Gingin Brook, flowing through the gorgeous Granville Park.

There is a unique water wheel along the brook, a replica of the one used to drive one of the local flour mills. This area of Western Australia is in the wheat belt.


A beautiful café is at the park, with indoor and outdoor seating. Sitting outside and sipping a lovely hot coffee and looking out at the park was a perfect way to spend this afternoon break on my journey back to Perth. More flowers in the park were in gorgeous full bloom.

Happy Travels!


#maturesolotraveler #solotraveler #solotraveller #australia #westernaustralia #perth #ayearinperth #wildflowers #gingin #churches

13 views0 comments