• Helen Avaient

The trees of the world await visitors at the Tasmanian Arboretum

Updated: Apr 5

Imagine being able to see plants for all over the temperate world in one pleasant place. This 66ha botanical garden in Northern Tasmania is home to over 4,800 tree species. With one metre of rainfall per annum, it rarely snows here in the sheltered valley on the banks of the Don River. The Arboretum is also migrating plants to warmer and drier species as the rainfall declines over the years.


The plantings are arranged geographically, and include areas such as Tasmania, Australia, New Zealand, North America, South America, Asia and the Himalayas, and Europe and the Mediterranean.


Located just 12 kms south of Devonport you will find over 23,000 plants in glorious growth. This is a peaceful and restful place, where you can relax and wander, admire and learn, taking time out from the busy of everyday.


I adored feeling grounded and connected, and back to nature when visiting the arboretum. There are always flowers in bloom here, either in the trees or at ground level.


Guided tours are available and can be booked beforehand, or you can stroll at your leisure. Various walking trails are well marked out.


This is a dog friendly garden, as long as they are on a leash, and no evidence of their visit is left behind.


Local Volunteers are also welcomed here and there is much for them to do in maintaining this beautiful venue with tasks such as mowing lawns, planting and maintenance. The Arboretum has been developed and maintained almost entirely by these dedicated helpers. The Arboretum also participates in the carbon offset program.


In addition to the planted trees, there are native forest and limestone outcrops. Information panels are situated to describe the various trees.


Weddings and parties are frequently held here. It is an ideal venue for people with children, as there is lots of space to run around. Picnics on the spacious green grass are also a popular activity.


Or maybe just sit under a rotunda, breathing in the fresh air and gaze at the amazing leafy vista. There is a serenity just being in the moment. Seating is situated around the garden to encourage visitors to do just this.


More than 80 bird species have been recorded in the gardens. Platypus also call the garden home and can often be seen swimming in the lake. Stand quietly on one of the bridges and keep a watchful eye out for these fast moving creatures. Also look out for the giant freshwater crayfish, possums, wallabies, pademelons, swans and snakes.


A kiosk is open at the garden (October to May) from 11am to 4pm, where delicious refreshments can be eaten indoors or outdoors. People are free to bring a picnic or use the coin operated bbq area provided. There are also wood-fired barbeques available to use.


I had the pleasure of being escorted and educated around the gardens by Phil Parsons, the president here for the last fifteen years. His love of the gardens was evident in his enthusiastic descriptions of the flora. Phil said that the ten year vision is to do more planting, especially of plants whose climate may become too extreme for their continued existence in their current environments.


12kms from Devonport, even getting here is enjoyable, with the meandering drive through countryside and farmlands. This is a truly delightful day out.


Entry fee applies.

Vehicle access is available for people with disabilities.


46 Old Tramway Road, Eugenana

www.tasmamianarboretum.org.au


While in the north of Tasmania, if you enjoy this botanical garden, make sure you visit the garden mentioned in the following story: Emu Valley Rhododenendron Garden is a must any time of the year (maturesolotraveler.com)


Happy Travels!


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